My monthly column in Sew Now Magazine

  When I first started out as The Wardrobe Angel I did my fair share of writing to get experience (read: for free!) I wrote for The Halifax Courier, I did guest blog posts, got my own blog up and running (click here for a read!) and I researched a weekly column for the now defunct Egg Mag about sustainability issues in the north of England. All those experiences gave me valuable experiences: meeting deadlines, planning and pitching ideas, keeping to a word count, sourcing and attributing images, understanding the editing process. After each column or blog was turned in I would always wait with excitement to see my work turn up online and in print. It was such a buzz! Now I have a print column AND get paid for it – a dream come true! I write a monthly column for the brand spanking new Sew Now magazine translating trends into sewing patterns combined with styling tips to help readers get more wear out of their wardrobes and sewn creations.     The column has schooled me in sewing patterns, acquainting me with new websites, and brought new businesses and brands to my attention. I think this is so important when you are self-employed and running your own business that you are constantly pushing yourself to learn new things. Tina Fey puts this really well (below). Now I’m not saying you can suddenly become a doctor and start operating on people if the only experience you’ve had is playing Operation the game. But if an opportunity comes your way, one that is aligned with your business and your brand, the...

What is a Wardrobe Angel moodboard?

    A moodboard is a collection of ideas – in this case visual ideas – which will give my client inspiration, advice and styling tips long after I have left her wardrobe. Creating them is honestly one of the most exciting parts of my job and I love nothing more than sitting down with glue, scissors and a stack of magazines ready to create her a work of moodboard art.   How do I begin a moodboard?   During a client appointment  I make loads of notes: blogs, books, websites, labels that I think the client will like. I also make a list of styling ideas to show the client – how to layer, how to combine textures, how to match colours. All these then make it on to the moodboard. I also take into account the objectives the client and I set for their appointment. The moodboard (above) was for a client who needed help putting together a work capsule wardrobe that took into account Dress Down Friday.   How long does a moodboard take?   I can spend a lot of time prepping the moodboard by pulling pages out of fashion magazines and compiling all the images I need. I also have 2 huge folders here in my office at Wardrobe Towers which are chock-full of articles and styling ideas. I’ll raid these folders and do lots of photocopying. A moodboard is A3 size and I fill both sides with inspiration. Putting together a moodboard takes me about 2 hours, including wrapping and posting.   How can I get a moodboard?   I offer a moodboard...
Why clients come to me

Why clients come to me

First and foremost I create wardrobes which showcase who my clients are, where they are going and what they stand for. People come to me for a variety of reasons:   Bereavement, new job, downsizing, break-up, new business, birthday milestone, new mum, weight loss, house move resulting in wardrobes needing to be unpacked,  going back to work, retiring…the list goes on!   Each client is individual, unique and entirely wonderful. Each has their own specific needs and it is my joy to delve down before, during, and after the appointment to make sure what I’m doing meets those needs and exceeds their expectations.  But what does “help clients with their wardrobes” mean?   How do I work? Firstly – I find out what the client wants. Heard that expression about the ears and the mouth? “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.” I can spend up to 40 minutes on the phone with my client finding out about their life, likes and dislikes, and most importantly how they want to feel in their clothes. Secondly – we work towards the objectives we set as a client/service provider partnership during the appointment whether that is a deep declutter or a styling session full of new outfit ideas. Thirdly – I provide each client with a Follow Up which is as individual as they are. Blogs, books, clothes and inspiration to fire their passion for individual style high into the sky. I want each client to fall back in love with their wardrobe and have a better relationship with the fashion industry, which many clients...